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http://kalsey.com/2004/07/telemachus_and_http/

Telemachus and HTTP July 26, 2004

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Related StoriesMore useless error messages Writting helpful error messages Staples.com: Yeah, we've got problems http://twas.brillig.and.the.slithy.toves.did.gyre.and.gimble. in.the.wabe.all.mimsy.were.the.borogoves. and.the.mome.raths.outgrabe.jabberwocky.com/ » Find other similar stories I apparently need to get out more often. The pastor in church told the story of Telemachus walking across Asia and Europe to get to Rome, where he climbed into the floor of the Colosseum and demanded that the gladiators stop their fighting. He was killed (some accounts say a gladiator did it, some say the spectators did so), but he accomplished his goals—that was the last gladiator fight in Rome. The date was January 1, 404.

I immediately thought, "404: Gladiator not found."


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saint telemachus

Saint Telemachus, a fourth-century monk who lived in a monastery, felt God calling him to Rome. He couldn't figure out why God would want him in Rome, but he felt the pressure to go. Putting his possessions in a little satchel, he threw the bag over his shoulder and started out over the dusty, westward roads to Rome.When he got to Rome, people were running about the city in great confusion. He had arrived on a day when the gladiators were going to fight both other gladiators and animals in the amphitheater. Everyone was heading to the amphitheater to watch the entertainment.

Telemachus thought this must be why God had called him to Rome. He walked into the amphitheater. He sat down among 80,000 people who cheered as the gladiators came out proclaiming, "'Hail Caesar! We die to the glory of Caesar."

The little monk thought to himself, Here we are, four centuries after Christ, in a civilized nation, and people are killing one another for the entertainment of the crowd. This isn't Christian!

Telemachus got up out of his seat, ran down the steps, climbed over the wall, walked out to the center of the amphitheater, and stood between two large gladiators. Putting his hands up, he meekly cried out, "In the name of Christ, stop!" The crowd laughed and jeered. One of the gladiators slapped Telemachus in the stomach with his sword and sent him spinning off into the dust.

Telemachus got up and again stood between the two huge gladiators. He repeated, "In the name of Christ, stop." This time the crowd chanted "Run him through!" One of the gladiators took his sword and ran it through Telemachus's stomach. He fell into the dust and the sand turned red as blood ran out of him. One last time, Telemachus weakly cried out, "'In the name of Christ, stop." He died on the amphitheater floor.

The crowd grew silent, and within minutes they emptied out of the amphitheater. History records that, thanks to Saint Telemachus, this was the last gladiatorial contest in the history of the Roman Empire.


http://www.jesusradicals.com/martyrs/telemachus.php

saint telemachus

Saint Telemachus, a fourth-century monk who lived in a monastery, felt God calling him to Rome. He couldn't figure out why God would want him in Rome, but he felt the pressure to go. Putting his possessions in a little satchel, he threw the bag over his shoulder and started out over the dusty, westward roads to Rome.When he got to Rome, people were running about the city in great confusion. He had arrived on a day when the gladiators were going to fight both other gladiators and animals in the amphitheater. Everyone was heading to the amphitheater to watch the entertainment.

Telemachus thought this must be why God had called him to Rome. He walked into the amphitheater. He sat down among 80,000 people who cheered as the gladiators came out proclaiming, "'Hail Caesar! We die to the glory of Caesar."

The little monk thought to himself, Here we are, four centuries after Christ, in a civilized nation, and people are killing one another for the entertainment of the crowd. This isn't Christian!

Telemachus got up out of his seat, ran down the steps, climbed over the wall, walked out to the center of the amphitheater, and stood between two large gladiators. Putting his hands up, he meekly cried out, "In the name of Christ, stop!" The crowd laughed and jeered. One of the gladiators slapped Telemachus in the stomach with his sword and sent him spinning off into the dust.

Telemachus got up and again stood between the two huge gladiators. He repeated, "In the name of Christ, stop." This time the crowd chanted "Run him through!" One of the gladiators took his sword and ran it through Telemachus's stomach. He fell into the dust and the sand turned red as blood ran out of him. One last time, Telemachus weakly cried out, "'In the name of Christ, stop." He died on the amphitheater floor.

The crowd grew silent, and within minutes they emptied out of the amphitheater. History records that, thanks to Saint Telemachus, this was the last gladiatorial contest in the history of the Roman Empire.

http://prayerfoundation.org/favoritemonks/favorite_monks_telemachus_coliseum.htm


The Story As Often Told

    Here is a brief summary of the story as it is usually told:
    In the fourth century a little monk named Telemachus from Asia (modern day Turkey comprises the Roman province of Asia; or perhaps Asia Minor is meant), was led by an inner voice to go to Rome without knowing why.  He followed the crowds to the Coliseum.  Two gladiators were fighting, and Telemachus tried to get between them to stop them, shouting three times, "In the name of Christ, forbear!" Telemachus was killed by being run through with the sword of one of the gladiators.  When the crowd saw the little monk lying dead in a pool of blood, they fell silent, leaving the stadium, one by one.  Because of Telemachus' death, three days later, the Emperor by decree ended the Games.

The Errors

    The errors found in the above story are: (1.) that the event above occurred in the fourth century.  It actually occurred in the early 400's A.D., (which is the fifth century); and (2.) that Telemachus was killed by a gladiator's sword, the crowd then leaving one by one, until all had left.  Telemachus actually was killed through being stoned to death by the furious crowd, enraged that someone would dare to interfere with their "entertainment." 
   Some critics claim that Telemachus' death cannot have ended the Coliseum Games, because the Games were held until the early fifth century.  This a false argument, because they are accepting the wrong dating of the event.  They are correct about the dating of the ending of the Games, but wrong in contending  that Telemachus' death was not the event that triggered their demise.  

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